Faye Bryant

Check your thinking.

David might have been recalling his anointing as king of Israel when he penned these words. I believe God said to write them, but as he wrote them, maybe he remembered Samuel passing up all his strong, handsome brothers for him, the youngest, the ruddy shepherd.

The prophet, Samuel, had told the family that God looks on the heart, not just the chronology of birth or the strength. Somewhat of a reprimand for those who chose Saul as king because he was head and shoulders taller and good looking and such.

I can see where Psalms 21:2 can be either comforting or frightening.

If a person has yielded their entire being to Christ, surrendering their very will to Him, this is comforting. They know that when they make a misstep, when they say something untoward, He knows their heart isn’t spiteful, filled with deceit or malice. He knows the mistake.

For those who choose to wield His Word like a club or a mace (the medieval club with spikes or blades on the battering end), to prove their point or to legitimize their agenda, these words can be frightening. God’s Word is always about reconciling broken mankind to Himself. We don’t do that by battering hurting souls. There is a difference between lovingly sharing a warning and declaring someone’s eternal demise.

It would be frightening for those who choose to continue in their chosen sin instead of surrendering to the Lord, too. If I say I’m a believer, a follower of Jesus, but I am constantly envious and am gluttonous, I need to remember that God is looking at my heart and I should be dismayed enough to make changes.

The truth is, there are times when we ALL think we’re right. Every one of us. And in reality, we’re all the way opposite from God’s right.

We all need to examine our own hearts in the light of all scripture – that means we have to read further than our few favorite verses. This is why reading through the whole Book is so very important. What God says to you while you’re reading in Leviticus and Numbers could be that thing that brings you into His will.

Jeremiah wrote in his Lamentations, “Let us examine our ways and test them and let us return to the Lord.”

He understood that we need to constantly keep an eye on what we do and the motives behind them in order to stay in God’s will.

Let’s do that today. Let’s take a few minutes to open ourselves and open the Book. Let’s be bold enough to ask God to point out every wicked (against God and His will) way in us. Then, when He shows us something, let’s be honest enough to agree with Him (confess) and repent (turn away) of that so we can walk with Him rather than opposite Him.

Coffee, Bible, Journal.